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Unconscious Bias in the Workplace: The Science and the Law

Wed, April 01, 2020 01:00 PM – 02:30 PM EDT 90 Minutes Credits HRCI 1.5 & SHRM 1.5 PDCs

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Speaker : Dr. Susan Strauss is a national and international speaker, trainer and consultant.

Objectives of the Presentation

  1. To define unconscious bias
  2. To examine the science of unconscious bias
  3. To list examples of unconscious bias
  4. To explain types of unconscious bias
  5. To explore the role of stereotypes in unconscious bias
  6. To discuss implicit association test (IAT)
  7. To identify steps in minimizing individual unconscious bias
  8. To outline steps HR and management should implement to diminish unconscious bias

Overview

We all experience some degree of unconscious bias—yes, even those of us that are well-intentioned. Unconscious bias includes the subtle associations we make towards groups of people. Stereotypes, which often operate unconsciously, are often the root of our bias. The phenomenon has been used to partially explain the racial tension in the U. S. and particularly with the police shootings of Black men. The U. S. Department of Justice (DOJ) recognizes the important role unconscious bias plays in the life of attorneys and law enforcement. As a result, the DOJ has been rolling out training to more than 23,000 agents in the FBI and other federal law enforcement agencies as well as 5,800 attorneys in 94 U. S. Attorney’s Offices around the country. State and local police and sheriff departments are also conducting unconscious bias training.

More and more organizations are incorporating unconscious bias training for managers and employees recognizing the role it plays in workplace discrimination including hiring, promotion, retention, and talent management practices. Wall Street estimated that 20% of large corporations conduct unconscious bias training. It shapes the organizational climate. One of the challenges in addressing implicit bias is, based on the research is that people are often resistant to accepting behavior that is inconsistent with their stereotypes, while accepting behavior that is consistent with stereotypes.

In spite of over 50 years of civil rights law, inequality continues based on sex, race, disability, and other protected classes, as it relates to levels of education, poverty and success. Unconscious bias, influences those inequalities. Courts have recognized the existence of unconscious discrimination since the earliest Title VII decisions and have specifically stated that Title VII reaches this form of discrimination

Implicit, or unconscious bias, exists in the workplace and classrooms.What does it look like?How can an employer create an unbiased work environment?How can management get in touch with their own unconscious biases to combat unintentional bias with colleagues and clients? Research suggests that unconscious bias regarding race and gender impacts relationships with those we interact with.

Who Will Benefit

  • All Management including team leaders, supervisors, middle managers, directors, and senior leaders, administrators
  • Human resources professionals including generalists and HR managers
  • Risk Managers
  • Attorneys
  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Law enforcement

This activity has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI). Please make note of the activity ID number on your recertification application form. For more information about certification or recertification, please visit the HR Certification Institute website at www.hrci.org

This program is valid for 1.5 PDCs for the SHRM-CP® or SHRM-SCP®


Your Instructor


Dr. Susan Strauss
Dr. Susan Strauss

Dr. Susan Strauss is a national and international speaker, trainer and consultant. She has worked as a psychiatric nurse and her undergraduate degree is in psychology and human services. Her specialty areas include discrimination, harassment, and bullying; management/leadership development, and organization development. She conducts harassment and bullying investigations and works as an expert witness for discrimination lawsuits.


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